7. Lonesome Fool

VERSE 1: 
Birds, fly across the sunset, the evening settles in
The last rays sunshine upon this hill
Nowhere in the wilderness, can I hear a sound
And no one knows how I feel...
no one knows how I feel

VERSE 2:
Coyote, howl to the moonlight, through the cold night air
Your lonesome song sure rings true
Thinking back... to the little things we shared
Now I know I was a fool
Now I know I was a fool

CHORUS:
Jenny come on back... to your lonesome fool
Now I know just what I have to do
Jenny make these empty nights like dampness on the ground
Blow away with the morning dew.
Blow away with the morning dew

VERSE 3:
Once... there were two sweet lovers, but now I'm on my own
My Jenny's gone her separate way
Walking through the cold dark night, guided by the dim starlight
I'm going to find my runaway,
Jenny help me find the way

CHORUS (with end):
Jenny come on back to your lonesome fool
Now I know just what I have to do
Jenny make these empty nights like shadows on the ground
Blow away with the morning dew
Blow away with the morning dew

CHORUS REPRISE:
Jenny come on back to your lonesome fool
Now I know just what I have to do
Jenny make these empty nights like shadows on the ground
Blow away with the morning dew
Blow away with the morning dew
Now I know I was fool

It seems that every song I wrote is tied to a location. No, not some exotic locale across the seas; not a smokey cafe in the Casbah... just some place I'd find in Los Angeles, perhaps up in the hills. I'd go up there, with my guitar, to sort out some feelings, and I'd come down the hill with a new song. Runyon Canyon was such a place. Remember the girlfriend (who lived with her quirky family)? Well, her name was Nita, short for Anita, and we were breaking up. Not wanting to be too near her (Runyon Canyon), I went to one of my alternate locations. Also hidden in LA is a beautiful, pristine mountain lake, Lake Hollywood. It's another strange locale because it is so well hidden by the surrounding hills, most lifelong residents of LA don't even know it's there. 

One of my favorite tricks was to drive old-time Angelinos up the twisted, convoluted roads over those hills (one of the reasons the lake was so unknown was the route to it is almost impossible to find), and, voila! As we'd crest the top of the last hill, they'd gasp! Below them was this pure, alpine lake, with the Hollywood Sign towering above, and downtown Hollywood peeking between the hills below. Off one of these winding roads was the spot, overlooking the lake, where I took my guitar and sad heart the day Nita & I broke up. As I started playing, an unseen coyote howled mournfully from the hills across the lake, and I had my first lyric, "Coyote howl to the moonlight, through the cold night air". The rest of the song fell into place, and I walked down the hill with a new song and feeling a little better. "Nita" is not a common name, and may sound confusing to listeners, so I changed the name to Jenny.